Apparently 2017 was the year of the Chinese adoption books

Looking at Little Fires Everywhere, The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane, and The Leavers.

I always thought I had an understanding about adoption. Never questioned much, just accepted everything I was grateful for. After reading Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng, The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See, and The Leavers by Lisa Ko, I’ve started thinking about it again.

It hasn’t been easy, or particularly fun (I should probably talk to a professional about this, but blogging will suffice in the meantime.) I set out with the goal to compare the three, and while reading them back-to-back-to-back started to weigh on me, it’s been enlightening too. Reading them together put into words a lot of the feelings I didn’t realize I even felt. By the end, finishing with Lisa Ko’s The Leavers, I had a new clarity on the topic. But I never felt like any one of them told a complete story of adoption. Here, let me explain each one a little better.
(Warning, spoilers ahead.) Continue reading

Meet Christine Chen

The behind the scenes force at WongFu Productions now onto create her own outlet for empowering women.

What fans see: the golden hour in beautiful, green park, the yellow light hitting a young Asian American couple at just the right angle over their shoulders as they sit in deep conversation about the state of their future. What Christine Chen sees: filming permits, actor schedules, props, mic cables, staying on schedule, lunch for the crew, and passerby who could disrupt every take. Continue reading

Hillary Clinton does not have to be “nice”

At the tail end of the presidential debate, Trump felt attacked by Clinton’s campaign ads and told her “it’s not nice and I don’t deserve that.”

The first 2016 presidential debate on Monday was Lesson 101 in hate-watching our current political situation. Enough has been said on who won (Clinton), the high and low points, and where Lester Holt disappeared to, but I’m focusing on one overlooked comment in particular. Continue reading

Anna May Wong’s life and legacy

As a film crew sets up shop in Los Angeles’ Chinatown, a little girl watches with rapt attention. Pestering the crew with questions about the movies and hoping to end up in one, she earned herself the nickname C.C.C., Curious Chinese Child. Years later, her loitering around would pay off when a casting agent in need of Chinese extras put her on screen and launched the career of one of the most successful silent actresses and one of the first Chinese American actresses in Hollywood: Anna May Wong. Continue reading